Coin Value Finder » 1972 Penny Value: are “D”, “S”, No mint mark worth money?

1972 Penny Value: are “D”, “S”, No mint mark worth money?

You might come across an unassuming penny from 1972 while sorting through your loose change. Maybe you don’t think twice about it, but what if we told you that this tiny coin could be worth more than its face value? The 1972 penny has become a collectible, with some examples fetching high auction prices. In this article, we’ll look into the fascinating world of the 1972 penny and its value, as well as why this ordinary coin has become such a commodity among collectors.

1972 Penny Value

  • Denomination: One cent
  • Composition: 95% copper, 5% zinc
  • Weight: 3.11 grams
  • Diameter: 19.05 mm
  • Edge: Plain
  • Designer: Victor David Brenner (obverse), Frank Gasparro (reverse)
  • Minted in: Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco (proof)
  • Total mintage: 2,933,255,000 (2.9 billion)

At first glance, the 1972 penny appears to be identical to any other coin from the time period. On the obverse, you can see a familiar portrait of President Abraham Lincoln, with the words “In God We Trust” and the year of issue below. The Lincoln Memorial is depicted on the reverse, with the words “One Cent” and “United States of America” surrounding it.

The value of the 1972 penny, however, distinguishes it from other pennies. While most pennies are only worth their face value of one cent, the 1972 penny has become a collector’s item. Some specimens have sold for as much as $1,500, far exceeding their face value.

A few factors contribute to its scarcity and collectibility, and the composition of the coin is one of the most significant aspects. The United States Mint changed the composition of the penny from 95% copper to 5% zinc to 97.5% zinc to 2.5% copper in 1972. This was done to reduce production costs, but it also meant that fewer copper pennies were minted that year. As a result, copper 1972 pennies are far more scarce and valuable than zinc ones.

The mintage of the 1972 penny is another factor that adds to its value. In 1972, nearly 3 billion pennies were minted, but only a small percentage of them were the highly desirable copper variety. Furthermore, many of these copper pennies were hoarded by collectors, reducing the number in circulation even further.

1972 Penny Value Chart

Mint Mark Good Fine Extremely Fine Uncirculated
1972 No Mint Mark Penny Value (Philadelphia) $0.01-0.02 $0.02- 0.05 $0.10 $0.25
1972 “D” Mint Mark Penny Value (Denver) $0.01-0.02 $0.02- 0.05 $0.20 $0.25
1972 “S” Mint Mark Penny Value (San Francisco) $0.01-0.02 $0.02- 0.05 $0.10 $1.50

1972 Penny Value and Varieties Guides

1972 No Mint Mark Penny Value (Philadelphia)

1972 No Mint Mark Penny

  • Type: One cent coin
  • Mark Category: No mint mark
  • Materials: 95% copper, 5% zinc
  • Edge: Plain
  • Mint Mark: None
  • Place of Minting: Philadelphia
  • Year of Minting: 1972
  • Face Value: $0.01
  • Price: From $0.01 in Good condition to $0.25 or more in Uncirculated condition
  • Quantity: 2,632,810,000 (2.6 billion)
  • Designer: Victor David Brenner
  • Mass: 3.11 grams
  • Diameter: 19.05 mm

The 1972 No Mint Mark Penny was struck in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Unlike most coins, this penny lacks a mint mark on its face, distinguishing it from other pennies minted in 1972. The coin has a plain edge and a face value of $0.01.

Despite its commonness, the 1972 No Mint Mark Penny has gained popularity among collectors due to its distinctive features. It is estimated that 2.6 billion of these coins were produced, making them easily accessible to collectors. The value of these coins varies according to their condition, ranging from $0.01 to $0.25 or more in uncirculated conditions.

1972 “D” Mint Mark Penny Value (Denver)

1972 "D" Mint Mark Penny

  • Type: One cent coin
  • Mark Category: D Mint Mark
  • Materials: 95% copper, 5% zinc
  • Edge: Plain
  • Mint Mark: D
  • Place of Minting: Denver
  • Year of Minting: 1972
  • Face Value: $0.01
  • Price: From $0.01 in good condition to $0.25 or more in Uncirculated condition:
  • Quantity: 2,933,255,000 (2.9 billion)
  • Designer: Victor David Brenner
  • Mass: 3.11 grams
  • Diameter: 19.05 mm

The 1972 Denver Mint Mark Penny is a common penny that was minted in large numbers, with 2.9 billion coins produced in total. The penny has a face value of $0.01 and was minted in 1972 at the Denver Mint. Despite its abundance, the 1972 Denver penny can still be valuable to collectors. It can be purchased in good condition for as little as $0.01, but in uncirculated condition, it can sell for $0.25 or more.

1972 “S” Mint Mark Penny Value (San Francisco)

1972 "S" Mint Mark Penny

  • Type: One cent coin Proof issue
  • Mark Category: S Mint Mark
  •  Materials: 95% copper, 5% zinc
  • Edge: Plain
  • Mint Mark: S
  • Place of Minting: San Francisco
  • Year of Minting: 1972
  • Face Value: $0.01
  • Price: Around $1.50 in uncirculated condition
  • Quantity: 2,632,810,000 (2.6 billion)
  • Designer: Victor David Brenner
  • Mass: 3.11 grams
  • Diameter: 19.05 mm

The face value of this penny is $0.01, and there are 2.6 billion coins in circulation. What distinguishes this penny is its mint mark, which is located on the obverse side of the coin, just below the date. The “S” mint mark denotes that the coin was produced in San Francisco.

This penny can sell for around $1.50 or more in uncirculated condition.

1972 Penny History

The 1972 penny, like all pennies, has a long and interesting history. The United States Mint produced it in three locations: Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco. The coin is made of 95% copper and 5% zinc and measures 19.05 mm in diameter and 3.11 grams in weight.

Various artists have created designs for the penny over the years, but the most famous is Victor David Brenner’s “Lincoln Memorial” design. This design, which featured a portrait of Abraham Lincoln on the front and an image of the Lincoln Memorial on the back, was introduced in 1909 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth.

With minor variations, the 1972 penny bears the same “Lincoln Memorial” design as its predecessors. The Philadelphia and Denver mint versions are unmarked, whereas the San Francisco proof version bears a “S” mint mark. The 1972 penny has a total mintage of over 5.5 billion coins, making it a widely circulated coin.

Despite its commonness, the 1972 penny is still valuable to collectors. The value of the penny varies according to the mint mark and condition, with the San Francisco proof version typically being more valuable than the Philadelphia and Denver mint versions.

Also Read: Top 20 Most Valuable Old Pennies Worth Money (Penny Collection)

1972 Penny Grading

Grading a 1972 penny, like grading any other coin, is an important process that determines the condition and, ultimately, the value of the coin. The grading method involves inspecting the coin’s surface, details, and overall appearance to determine its worth.

The Sheldon scale, which ranges from 1 to 70, is the most commonly used coin grading scale, with 1 being the lowest grade and 70 being the highest grade.

List of 1972 Penny Errors

Doubled Die Obverse (DDO)

When the die used to stamp the coin is doubled, the image of Lincoln’s profile on the front of the coin becomes distorted. The doubling is visible in the inscriptions and the image of Lincoln’s profile, giving the impression of a shadow or ghost image. The 1972 Doubled Die Obverse penny is one of the most well-known and sought-after errors in the Lincoln cent series, and higher-grade examples can fetch thousands of dollars.

Doubled Die Reverse (DDR) 

This error, like the DDO, occurs when the die used to stamp the back of the coin is doubled, resulting in a distorted image of the Lincoln Memorial on the coin’s reverse. The doubling is visible in the inscriptions and images of the Lincoln Memorial, giving the impression of a shadow or ghost image. Although the 1972 Doubled Die Reverse penny is not as well-known or valuable as the DDO variety, it remains a popular and sought-after error among collectors.

Repunched Mint Mark (RPM) 

1972 Penny Repunched Mint Mark

When the mint mark on a coin is stamped more than once, a ghost image of the mint mark appears that is slightly offset from the original. This error is frequently visible to the naked eye as a faint or doubled image of the mint mark. The 1972 RPM penny is fairly common and can be found in circulation or on pennies rolls.

Die Clash 

This error occurs when the stamping dies collide without a blank planchet in between, resulting in an impression of the dies on both sides of the coin. The clash can be seen as raised lines or incuse marks on the coin’s surface. The 1972 Die Clash penny is not as well-known or valuable as some other errors, but it is a fun variety to collect.

Broadstrike 

1972 Penny Broadstrike

When the coin is struck without the retaining collar, it has a broad, flat edge and no reeding. The broad stroke is characterized by an incomplete or missing rim on the coin, and the coin’s edge is much wider than usual. The 1972 Broadstrike penny is a popular error among collectors, and depending on the degree of the broad-strike, it can be worth more than a regular penny.

Wrong Planchet

This is a mistake made when a blank planchet intended for a different denomination is used to strike the coin, resulting in a coin of the incorrect size, weight, and composition. A wrong planchet can be defined as a coin that is either too small or too large for its denomination, or a coin that has a different color or composition than it should. The 1972 Wrong Planchet penny is a very rare error that can be worth thousands of dollars.

1972 Penny FAQ

Is there anything special about a 1972 penny?

Yes, the 1972 penny has a few unique features. For starters, this is the final year that the Lincoln cent was made of 95% copper. The composition was changed to a copper-coated zinc alloy in 1973. Furthermore, some 1972 penny have some notable errors, including the Doubled Die Obverse and Doubled Die Reverse varieties, which are highly sought after by collectors.

How do I know if my 1972 penny is double die?

To determine if your 1972 penny is a double die, carefully examine the inscriptions and images with a magnifying glass. Look for signs of doubling, such as a shadow or ghost image, especially near the inscriptions “In God We Trust” or “Liberty” on the coin’s obverse. The doubling could also be seen on Lincoln’s profile or on the date. If you are unsure, seek the advice of a coin dealer or professional grader.

How many 1972 double die pennies are there?

The exact number of 1972 double die pennies minted is unknown, but it is thought to be a small number. Because the United States Mint did not keep precise records of error coins at the time, determining the exact mintage is difficult.

How much is a 1972 penny worth?

The value of a 1972 penny is determined by several factors, including the coin’s condition, whether or not it has any errors, and where it was minted. A regular 1972 penny is worth one cent face value. However, a 1972 penny with errors, such as the Doubled Die Obverse or Doubled Die Reverse varieties, can be worth significantly more. The value of a 1972 double-die penny can range from a few hundred dollars to several thousand dollars.

How many 1972 double die pennies are there?

It is unknown how many double die pennies were minted in 1972. However, it is thought that there are only a few of them, making them a rare and valuable variety among collectors.

4 thoughts on “1972 Penny Value: are “D”, “S”, No mint mark worth money?”

  1. Hello everyone I have a 1972 P copper penny and looks like double die obverse and reverse.I am not sure but to me look like a proof and the weight is a bit heavier than normal .It was like 3.15G
    .I am just wondering if this coin is normal coin or have value ..I am hoping you guys can give me more information about this coin. Thank you

    Reply

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