Coin Value Finder » 1994 Quarter Value: are “P”, “D”, “S” mint mark worth money?

1994 Quarter Value: are “P”, “D”, “S” mint mark worth money?

The 1994 Washington quarter is one of the many coin series of the Washington quarter category initially struck to commemorate George Washington’s 200th anniversary. This 1994 coin was introduced into American coinage in high quantities and in different mint locations.

Having been produced over two decades ago in considerably high circulation, it may be hard to determine the quality or value of the 1994 Washington quarter coin. However, this article is a breakdown of how they’re priced and what you should expect when purchasing the coin.

1994 Quarter Value details

  • Category: Washington Quarter
  • Mints: Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Denver
  • Total Mintage: 1,708,904,033 (1.7 billion)
  • Thickness: 1.75mm
  • Weight: 5.67g
  • Shape: Round
  • Face value: Twenty-five cents
  • Diameter: 24.3mm
  • Edge: Reeded
  • Composition: 91.67% Copper, and 8.33% Nickel
  • Observe designer: John Flanagan
  • Reverse designer: John Flanagan

Also Read: Top 15 Most Valuable Quarters In Circulation

1994 Quarter Value Chart

Mint Good Fine Extra fine Uncirculated
1994 P Washington Quarter $0.25 $3 $49 $55
1994 D Washington Quarter $0.25 $8 $17 $48
1994 S Washington Quarter (Clad proof) $5 $11 $19 $35
1994 S Washington Quarters (Silver proof) $7 $15 $43 $65

1994 Quarter Values and Varieties Guide

1994 P Washington Quarter

1994 P Washington Quarter

  • Category: Washington Quarter
  • Mints: Philadelphia
  • Mint mark: P or no mint mark
  • Mintage: 825,600,000
  • Shape: Round
  • Diameter: 24.3 millimeters
  • Thickness: 1.75 millimeters
  • Face value: ($0.25)
  • Edge: Reeded
  • Designer: John Flanagan
  • Weight: 5.67 grams
  • Composition: 91.67% Copper, 8.33% Nickel

This variant of the 1994 Washington Quarter was minted in Philadelphia with over 825 million mintage being the second highest in production of the coin series. While some coins have a “P” mint mark, others don’t. And just like other coins in this category, the 1994 P Washington Quarter has a face value of $0.25 but may be worth more depending on its grade and condition.  

An average 1994 P Washington coin is worth about $3, and in its circulated state, it costs between $0.25 and $0.85. However, in the open market, these coins could cost up to $290 in their uncirculated state and $1,150 in an MS67 grade. Thus, to get the best quality and condition for this coin, you’ll need to spend a little more, and thankfully, they’re a relatively easy find. Also, you can get this coin in lower grades if you’re on a low budget.

1994 D Washington Quarter

1994 D Washington Quarter

  • Category: Washington Quarter
  • Mints: Denver
  • Mint mark: D
  • Mintage: 880,034,110
  • Face value: Twenty-five cents ($0.25)
  • Designer: John Flanagan
  • Edge: Reeded
  • Shape: Round
  • Diameter: 24.3 millimeters
  • Thickness: 1.75 millimeters
  • Weight: 5.67 grams
  • Composition: 91.67% Copper, 8.33% Nickel

The D quarter variety had the highest quantity of mintages among the different types produced in 1994, totaLling over 880 million in mintages with a “D” mint mark. Due to its high production, this coin can be easily seen and purchased in exchange markets for a relatively low price. For instance, in its circulated form, the 1994 D quarter ranges from $0.30 to $1 and more depending on the coin’s condition and grade. But high-graded coins in uncirculated forms could sell for about $10 and $750 in their pristine state. In 2018, an MS67 was sold for $1500 on eBay but dropped to $840 in 2020 at Stack’s Bowers.

So, regardless of its commonness, the 1994 D Washington Quarter still has a considerably good value and is worth collecting.

1994 S Washington Quarter (Clad Proof)

1994 S Washington Quarter (Clad Proof)

  • Category: Washington Quarter
  • Mints: San Francisco
  • Mint mark: S
  • Mintage: 2,484,594
  • Face value: Twenty-five cents ($0.25)
  • Designer: John Flanagan
  • Edge: Reeded
  • Shape: Round
  • Diameter: 24.3 millimeters
  • Thickness: 1.75 millimeters
  • Weight: 5.67 grams
  • Composition: 91.67% Copper, 8.33% Nickel

Coins of this series made in San Francisco are considered unique to those of other mintages. This is because they were produced specifically for collectors and not to be circulated. So not only were they made in significantly lower quantities than the others, the 1994 S Quarters are common in circulation. They were mirror-like proofs done with a computerized laser.

Their prices for low grades and in average condition could range from $0.25 to $0.50 and will cost up to $12 in good condition. Also, these coins will cost a lot more in open markets and auctions. But like every other coin, their price/value depends on various factors, including grade, condition, and uniqueness. In 2004, a PR 70 DCAM was sold for $308, and $19 in 2020. They have an S mint mark.

1994 S Washington Quarter (Silver Proof)

1994 S Washington Quarter (Silver Proof)

  • Category: Washington Quarter
  • Mints: San Francisco
  • Mint mark: S
  • Mintage: 785,000
  • Face value: Twenty-five cents ($0.25)
  • Designer: John Flanagan
  • Edge: Reeded
  • Shape: Round
  • Diameter: 24.3 millimeters
  • Thickness: 1.75 millimeters
  • Weight: 5.67 grams
  • Composition: 91.67% Copper, 8.33% Nickel

This coin type was the least produced quarter in 1994, which is understandable since making proof coins requires attention to detail and more time than the standard quarter coins. However, they were also more beautiful and shiny, which explains why they are sought after and can be rare.

This coin is one of many silver-proof coin series produced by the US mint and is very valuable. However, their prices differ depending on their condition and grade. Usually, they cost between $0.25 and $12 in an open exchange market. However, unique and highly graded coins may cost more in auctions. For instance, it cost $353 in PR-70 and was sold for $863 in 2007.

Also Read: Top 16 Most Valuable Modern Quarters Worth Money

History of the 1994 Quarter

The Washington Quarter was initially produced in 1932 to honor the first American President, George Washington, on his 200th birthday. However, it was eventually retained, displacing the standing liberty quarter and producing over 6 million copies in 1932. The 1994 quarter was one of the last years of the Washington Quarter mintage. And it had the same design as all other Washington Quarters.

The coin’s obverse has a left drawing of George Washington designed by John Flanagan, and the inspiration was gotten from Jean Antoine’s 1786 sculpture. It was described as a very remarkable coin design struck in 91.67% Copper and 8.33% nickel with a mass of 5.67 grams and reeded edges. It was relatively easier to mint than other previous artistic coins.

Above and around Washington’s portrait on the coin’s obverse is the inscription “LIBERTY” and the year of mintage, 1994, beneath it. Then, by the left side of the coin under his chin, you can see the US motto, “IN GOD WE TRUST”. And on the right side, behind his ponytail, is where the coin’s mint mark is written, either “P”, “D”, or “S”. However, on some coins, there might be no mint mark.

On the other hand, the reverse has a design of a heraldic eagle facing left with its wings spread out. It rested on a bundle of arrows all facing left with olive branches curved and a “QUARTER DOLLAR” inscription beneath it. While just above the eagle’s head is the Latin phrase “E PLURIBUS UNUM”, which translates to “out of many, one”, and “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” along the utmost part of the rim.

This design lasted from 1932 to 1998, after which it was modified by William Cousins for the States and Territories Quarters. The design was changed in 2022 to a portrait by Laura Gardin Fraser.

Also Read: 10+ Rarest State Quarter Errors Lists (Worth Much Money!!!)

1994 Quarter Grading

Various factors determine a coin’s value, including its condition, grade, rarity, mint errors, and population. Common among these factors is the coin’s grading which you can confirm by sending it to grading companies or experts. These companies use the Sheldon grading scale, which goes from the poor state (P-1) to the mint state (MS70). Also, coins are graded by using words to tell their condition; here are some of the common grades:

  • Uncirculated: Coins in this grade are in very condition with no wear. The coin is perfectly centered with its original shine and luster. No scratches or damage are visible; if not perfect, it’s an almost perfect mint
  • Extra fine: This coin has been in circulation for a while and has been gently used. The details on the coin are evident, and its gadgets are delicate and bold. The coin still holds its original shine, and its luster is intact.
  • Fine: In this state, the coin is moderately damaged with slightly visible scratches and loss of details. The features are, however, still noticeable, and the letters and inscriptions are readable.
  • Good: The coin is worn and visible. It has been in circulation for a long time, and the coin’s details have started to wear off. The elements are faint, and the rims are almost secluded from the field.

1994 Quarter Errors

Besides standard coins minted in 1994, there are also some quarters with errors which is unsurprising since the 1994 Washington Quarters were created in millions. Some errors may be displacement with the planchet or issues with the die or strike. These equipment are constantly used in mintage and, if not properly maintained, will undergo wear and tears, thus, resulting in coin errors. Some of these errors are expensive and are usually sold higher than standard coins. Some of the 1994 Washington Quarter errors include:

1. Quarter Reverse Clad Layer Missing

Quarter Reverse Clad Layer Missing

Typically, quarters have a cupronickel layer, but on this coin, this layer is missing on the reverse, while the obverse looks normal. This makes the back have the color of a penny with a quarter design. This coin was sold at MS64 for $211.

2. Double-Struck Error

1994 Washington Quarter Double-Struck Error

Coins might get double-struck if there is a delay with the automated feeder fingers that feed them in and out of the press. So, coins may get double-struck or even multi-struck on their way out. This will make the coin have a deformed shape and duplicated details. This type of coin was sold for $138 at MS61.

3. Bonded Pair Error

This error occurs when two coins overlap or the die strikes the two at the same time, which causes them to be deformed and have multiple strikes. They were once sold for $1610 in MS63 and 64.

4. Die cap error

When a coin gets struck and covers or obstructs the next one, this will make both coins have a blank or blurry surface. However, the coin struck is called a die cap error, while the blocked coin is called a blockage error. The die cap was sold in MS63 for $150.

5. Broad Struck Off-Center Error

Broad Struck Off-Center Error

This coin error occurs when the planchet shifts before the die strikes or is incorrectly placed. The coin will then have a blank part and the details off the center. This coin is also broad-struck and double-struck. It was sold for about $125.

6. Elliptical Clip Error

Elliptical Clip Error

The planchet is struck into an elliptical rather than a standard circular shape. So, this will make the coin deformed and set aside from the others. However, since this error is not drastic, the coin may not be sold for much. It was sold for $25 in MS62.

Check out this video to see 1994 Quarters that are unique and worth way more than their face value.

FAQs

1. What’s the Worth of a 1994 Quarter?

A 1994 proof quarter has a $0.25 face value but is worth up to $12, based on its grade and condition.

2. What Year Has The Rarest Quarter?

The 1932 quarter is one of the years with the least mintage, totaling under one million. As a result, these coin quarters are the rarest of the Washington quarter series.

3. How Do I Know If My 1994 Quarter Has An Error?

Most coins with errors are easily noticeable, so if you know what the 1994 quarter looks like, you can determine an error coin by merely looking at it. Then, if you still need to figure it out, you can take it to a coin appraiser to examine.

Conclusion

Every coin has a value regardless of its state and condition, and fortunately, the 1994 Washington Quarter isn’t a low-valued coin even though it’s popular and has a high mintage. Based on their grades, rarity, and error 1994 quarter could cost between $3 to $1000 and more in a coin market. Best believe there’s a coin for every budget, and as a collector, you can choose what grade and price best suits you

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